US Partnership Deal With Owen Mumford Announced

The partnership between Forte Medical and Owen Mumford USA was launched today at the OCTANe Medical Innovation Technology Forum (MTIF) at Newport Beach, CA 28-29 October 2019. 

Introducing Peezy Midstream to the USA has long been an ambition of Forte Medical. Our disruptive and innovative MedTech called for a partner with experience, knowledge and a savvy mindset. We found that partner in Atlanta-based Owen Mumford USA whose reach covers the USA and Canada and is managed by Travis Shaw.

Owen Mumford has been at the forefront of medical device innovation for over 65 years, creating solutions that improve the delivery of healthcare and home health treatments for people around the world. Their products span devices that make blood testing more comfortable to solutions that make it easier to administer life-saving medication.

Owen Mumford’s experience in medical devices began in the 1950s when founders Ivan Owen and John Mumford established the company. The company have direct sales offices and a network of distribution partners serving customers in over 60 countries, and employ over 800 people across the Americas, Europe and Asia.  

“Owen Mumford USA is delighted to partner Forte Medical in North America and Canada,” says Travis Shaw. “Our team looks forward to expanding our mutual synergies. Research indicates that Peezy Midstream can add significant clinical and cost value to healthcare providers, a true win-win for all parties.”
 
Thanks to the Greater Irvine Chamber of Commerce for making this possible.

Forte Medical UCI conference

Attending the Greater Irvine Chamber’s 2018 Life Sciences

Giovanna Forte, CEO was delighted to be one of 10 British executives to make their way to UC Irvine (UCI) for the Greater Irvine Chamber’s 2018 Life Science Showcase event.

In collaboration with UCI Applied Innovation, the Greater Irvine Chamber hosted UK owned life science companies to position Southern California and UCI as a strong global brand for innovation and entrepreneurship. Applied Innovation worked closely with the chamber to promote industry cluster growth in the region.

Click here to read more about the event

urine sample testing

“If you come down with a UTI, seek treatment and get your urine tested.”

This is the latest recommendation following publication of a Californian study about the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.   But right-first-time diagnosis and treatment is only possible if the urine sample is collected correctly in the first place.

In the UK, nearly 1 in 3 women will have a UTI by the time they are 24 and around 1 in 30 boys by the age of 16.   Additionally – according to the Unplanned Admissions Committee  the NHS spent £434 million in 2013/14 on treating 184,000 patients in unplanned admissions associated with a UTI.

Prevention, technology and how to unblock NHS adoption

The inaugural speech delivered by Mr Matt Hancock upon his appointment as Secretary of State for Health, focused quite rightly on the acceleration of preventative practice and the adoption of novel technology.  Forte Medical welcomes this approach … if it happens.  

It is high time to highlight and seriously consider the problems behind historic innovation adoption across the NHS because examples of what works – and just as importantly what doesn’t – can only serve to steer the powers that be to develop a better way. Our game-changing urine collection technology, which many rightly observe “has been around for years” is a prime example of how and why changes need to be made.

The NHS has long enjoyed international recognition for its vision and offering; yet Forte Medical has endeavoured to work with the NHS for over eight years – the outcomes of which more later – but the difference in our experiences of engaging in the US healthcare sector through the ABHI Trade Mission is palpable and there is much that could be learnt from their approach.

In the US, those of us attending with the ABHI are given the opportunity to present an “accelerator pitch” to leadership and key stakeholders of leading healthcare providers. Clinical, Medical and Nursing Directors, Patient Safety, Infection Control, Finance and Procurement will gather to meet us and listen to what we have to say. They get it – and are not afraid to try something new. In a few short months, Forte Medical has not only evaluations live with a number of leading providers, short-circuiting the equivalent process endemic here in the UK, but sales to laboratories that serve the health insurance market.

In the absence of NHS Leadership willing to accept an equivalent scheme where the AHSN Network may short-list and present the most compelling innovations every quarter, other steps must be taken to make such introductions seamless and effective.

Happily there have been successes for us over the past eight years. The excellent clinical results around Peezy Midstream are being recognised; thanks to the work of the ABHI, the AHSNs and a handful of diligent Healthcare Professionals, adoption is becoming a reality.

Meanwhile, I offer to those in the driving seat some examples of where, to the detriment of clinical outcomes, patient safety and yes, cost savings, inertia has proven easier to embrace than change. This in itself is where change is most needed.

2013: Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust: A peer reviewed and published clinical trial of 104 male and female patients delivered a reduction in urine specimen contamination from a Trust average of 23% to 6%. The Abstract presented at the World Congress of Endourology and the Societe International de Urologie, surmised that: “Peezy is a welcome innovation by patients. The improvement in possible unreliable results was impressive, suggesting a significant financial saving due to the common nature of the investigation in LUTS assessments.”

At that time Peezy Midstream could have delivered direct savings to the Trust of £160,000 and indirect savings of £3.2m taking into account outlying costs of repeat appointments and tests. Procurement was disinterested, citing specimen collection as a non-priority and their position in Special Measures as prevention to the adoption of anything new (just when it was probably most needed).

2015: Barts Health NHS Trust: Professor Frank Chinegwundoh has Championed Peezy Midstream since he began a trial of 200 patients in his own clinic at the Royal London. He publicly presented interim results proving a reduction in historic contamination rates of 23% to 1.5% across 66 patients, pointing to significant clinical and cost improvements for the whole Trust. Despite his best efforts and support from the Trust’s Microbiology team, he has struggled to complete the evaluation. We have attempted to engage with antenatal to transfer the evaluation there but they, together with procurement and overall Trust leadership remain elusive. Are potential direct savings of £214k and indirect of £4.3m not worth investigating?

2016: Infection Control Director, Home Counties NHS Trust: The UK’s first Infection Control Director was familiar with Peezy Midstream, having spent 18 months setting up a trial that never happened at a London Teaching Hospital. On reading of his new appointment, we contacted him to see if he would implement his earlier work on this study at the new NHS Trust. The answer perplexed: if we sponsored his Conference at the RSM to the tune of £10,000 he would ensure the trial took place with good results. We thanked him and declined.

2018: A South West NHS Trust: The Head of Gynaecology and Obstetrics at this General Hospital was keen to trial Peezy Midstream to counter the 9% urine specimen contamination rate cited in antenatal, where screening accuracy is so important. A protocol was produced and trial conducted; the resulting paper citing tangible clinical improvements and cost savings with a potential for reduced broad spectrum antibiotic prescribing. This Abstract was peer reviewed, published and presented at a leading Conference earlier this year.

We asked the Clinical Lead if given the evidence and benefits she would now adopt Peezy Midstream? She demurred, saying by email that “Following the study, the way in which the wee is collected improved and the midwives and HCAs started to follow the right rules of sending off only the right urines. Not as good as with a Peezie [sic], but better than before.”

A new study has shown that Peezy Midstream reduces antenatal false positives by almost 70%; by implication the HCAs are still sending off too many “right urines” wasting time, money and possibly prescribing unnecessary broad spectrum antibiotics to pregnant women. Add to this the transient nature of staff, forgotten instructions … and in other words: Your innovation works but I am not prepared to make changes and although I don’t know what happens behind the closed toilet door, I am prepared to assume that patients will listen to verbal instruction … and be damned if they don’t. 

Innovation Managers in the South, North and Midlands: In 2014 and 2015, three “clinical innovation leads” from Trusts that boasted high urine contamination rates were presented with Peezy Midstream as a route to clinical excellence and cost savings. One manager refused outright to engage with an evaluation citing urine as “low priority”; the other two sat on the trial product for so long, the three-year use-by date expired.

Private providers who profit from inaccuracy and repeat testing: One of the largest private NHS laboratory providers assured us some time ago, that they would “never use or recommend use of your device; if it reduces retests to the extent you say, it will knock about half a million off our bottom line.” When I enquired as to their commitment to help the NHS treat its patients efficiently they observed “that’s the NHS’s problem, we have shareholders to answer to.”

Connecting the dots between clinician, trial, procurement and adoption

Every evaluation, every clinical trial must be conducted with the involvement and approval of all relevant stakeholders; without these interests being represented, evidence of prevention and improvements across the many facets of clinical and patient care stand not a chance of being translated into Good Practice. Thank heavens for the arrival of the AHSNs – would that they had existed in our earlier years.

The Future Operating Model (FOM) may also change things; our own Category Tower Manager Akeso&Co has visited almost every NHS lab in the country to understand their challenges. If this diligence has been mirrored across the other Consultancies involved, a more logical, efficient and pragmatic view of innovation being delivered to the NHS could become a reality.

Meantime, the money wasted for all parties in trials that go nowhere, not to mention the lost benefits that could have been delivered to patients and NHS Finances over the last five years from our own NHS GP created innovation, doesn’t bear thinking about. We believe we are nearly there; meantime, the USA calls. One way or another our perseverance will pay dividends for the one in four patients both here and across the pond, where diagnoses fail because of inconsistent urine collection methods. They deserve so much better.

  • Four steps to accelerating preventative innovation within the NHSWhere innovation has arrived outside of an AHSN introduction but is desirable, ensure the appropriate AHSN is involved to better cement protocols, stakeholder interest, deliverables and adoption
    • Incentivise clinical staff to embrace evaluations that, if successful will deliver tangible improvements to their work and working lives.
    • Appoint “adoption” managers who will oversee the implementation of new technology so that a more seamless approach is taken with wholesale acceptance by clinical teams
    • Reward private contractors on clear results and value, not volume; until then the NHS will fail to receive best endeavours in the interests of its patients – or balance sheets.

Making It Work In The USA

The success of the ABHI’s Innovation Hub at the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas in Austin is growing and it is case studies such as ours published this month that is helping demonstrate the importance of the Association’s work in building opportunities for British companies.    Read our story here.

Urine infection medication

AMR: A Heavy Price To Pay

News from the USA: “the share of bacterial infections in the United States that were antibiotic resistant more than doubled over 13 years, rising from 5.2% in 2002 to 11% in 2014”

To read more, click here

Texas MedTech Mission Create Demand for British Goods

Paul Benton, International Director at the ABHI shares our story as to how we entered the US marketplace

Appointed sales and distribution partners, dedicated warehouse facilities and new US customers are just some of the outcomes from the UK MedTech missions to Texas.  Read more

ABHI Innovation Hub Established at Dell Medical School, Texas

As a regular participant of the ABHI Trade Missions to Texas, we are delighted to be part of this exciting development….

The Association of British Healthcare Industries (ABHI) and the Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin are delighted to announce the establishment of the “ABHI Innovation Hub”.

The creation of the Hub, a first for ABHI, will offer UK companies the opportunity to locate themselves at a world-class facility and develop their US business within an ecosystem of clinicians, investors and mentors. It offers companies a compelling office location, providing them the infrastructure to focus on accelerating market access in Texas and beyond.

The Hub will be located within Dell Med’s Health CoLab, a new initiative that provides space and creates connections for start-up companies that share the school’s mission to create healthier communities, starting in Austin and the surrounding area. The Health CoLab directly supports the school, seeking out innovation that promotes health, enhances medical services, increases care resources and access for people in this community in ways that can be scaled to other communities.

“The ABHI Innovation Hub at Dell Medical School will offer UK companies a unique opportunity to collaborate in a truly world class facility,” said Phil Kennedy, Chairman of the ABHI. “The Hub will support promising medical technology innovation whilst looking to develop value based healthcare for the benefit of patients in Texas, throughout the US and at home in the UK.”

The Dell Medical School has a strong focus on supporting health entrepreneurs and businesses. In addition to the CoLab, companies that base themselves in the Innovation Hub will be able to participate in the ‘Texas Health Catalyst,’ a programme designed by the Dell Medical School to foster health research and advance innovation.

“We are very excited to be working with ABHI to strengthen ties between the UK and Austin across a variety of health and technology areas,” said Ruben Rathnasingham, Assistant Dean for Health Product Innovation at Dell Medical School. “We look forward to working with the ABHI, its members and the UK going forward.”

The partnership also extends support to Texas-based companies that are looking to understand and enter the UK healthcare market. Through ABHI’s International Membership scheme, companies looking to introduce innovative medical technology (MedTech) to the UK will be offered insight and market-access knowledge, as well as assistance from a number of partner organisations, including the UK’s Department of International Trade.

“Through this collaboration, companies will be closer to a range of innovation initiatives that we have created and are continuing to create at Dell Med,” said Mellie Price, the school’s Executive Director of Commercialization. “They will find themselves in a rich, creative environment.”

The Forte Medical Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine

We are proud to be part of Urology Awareness Month this September:
“Clinical Innovation in Specimen Collection and Diagnostics”

Royal Society of Medicine
Tuesday 13 September 2016 – 9.30 am to 12.30 pm
A Urology Awareness Month Event

 

Imagine if blood specimens were delivered to the laboratory with mixed growth rates ranging from 0.38% to over 70%. Unlike blood specimen collection, there is no protocol for the collection of urine and this disparity in specimen quality is a reality across today’s NHS.

Like blood, urine is used for diagnosis and treatment that saves lives. Yet in this basic area of medicine, where 65 million urine specimens are analyzed annually in the UK, high numbers of unreliable specimens are wasting money and jeopardising the health of the nation.

Forte Medical is the leading designer of specimen collection systems that make right-first-time analysis, diagnosis and treatment implicit to routine medicine and this Forum, with the support and participation of The Urology Foundation, Association of British Healthcare Industries (ABHI) and the South East Health Technologies Alliance (SEHTA), will address the needs and incite debate around the adoption of improved collection processes.

Chaired by Dr Dawn Harper with an introduction from Louise de Winter, Chief Executive of The Urology Foundation, the Forum includes presentations by:
Miss Linda Collins, BSc MSc RN, Whittington Health NHS Trust, on the outcome of a three year, randomized, single blind comparative study on urine sampling method.

Professor Frank Chinegwundoh MBE, Barts and The Royal London NHS Trust, on Quality Improvement Audit results around diligent specimen collection, associated hygiene and what improvements mean for clinician and patient.

Professor James Barlow, Professor of Technology and Innovation Management (Healthcare), Imperial College Business School, on how innovation can transform health outcomes, with implicit cost and efficiency savings.

There will also be a discussion panel with the above participants and other key opinion-formers in health and patient care, including Professor Alan Sinclair, Director of Foundation for Diabetes Research in Older People, and Senior Editor of Pathy’s Principles and Practice of Geriatrics and Gerontology, followed by audience Q&As.

Places are limited: to book, please contact:
Nicola Hyde +44 (0)7801 187757 forum@forte-medical.com

Note to Media Editors:
Forte Medical: Introducing an accurate, hygienic and dignified solution to an overlooked area of basic medicine has been the mission of Forte Medical for the past ten years. Co-founded by Giovanna Forte and her NHS GP brother, Dr Vincent Forte, it began with Dr Forte’s repeated problems in getting reliable midstream urine specimens from patients from which he could diagnose their symptoms and accurately treat. He designed a solution, the Peezy Midstream. Today, the Peezy is in use within over 40 NHS Trusts and the private healthcare system. Proud to make in Britain, Forte Medical has recently started exporting to the USA.

All media enquiries to Nicola Hyde

Exporting healthcare innovation: an interview

 

Interesting specimens: saving healthcare budgets by exporting healthcare innovation and universal diligence.

LinkedInPicOnline business magazine Womanthology interviewed Forte Medical CEO Giovanna Forte about specimen collection as an overlooked area of medicine, solving problems and exporting to the USA. Read the interview.